landscape

On July 16th, 2014, “LETTING WILDFLOWERS TAKE OVER MY FRONT LAWN”…

site #44 owners Jennifer & Timothy at the end of the season

site #44 owners Jennifer & Timothy at the end of the season

…is the title of the story written by Wildflowering L.A. site #44 owner Jennifer Mandel, just posted on Zócalo Public Square

A few weeks ago, a guy from Wildflowering LA came to take away the sign; we had him take one last picture of us with it in our scraggly and faun-colored yard. We were sad to see it go. The few flowers that are still blooming miraculously from the scorched earth are proof that native plants can hold their own in this dry climate.”

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On May 20th, 2014, BALES OF STRAW…

straw and hay bales piled high at the feed and seed

straw and hay bales piled high at the feed and seed 

…a favored source of garden bed and pathway mulch, is procured this afternoon from the nearby Glendale horsey feed and seed shop, prompted by some wilty annual veg plants suffering in the recent summer-like 100 degree temps.

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On May 1st, 2014, A WILDFLOWERING THANKYOU…

Wildflowering L.A. show, April 26-27, 2014

Wildflowering L.A. show, April 26-27, 2014

…to those who made the culminating Wildflowering L.A. show/event last weekend possible…

Genny Arnold and Lili Singer (Theodore Payne Foundation) / Michelle Matthews and Veronica Franco (The Shed) /  Leigh Adams, Erin Harkey, Joshua Link, Tom McKenzie, Brooke Sauer, Andy Wilcox, Richard Schulhof (director, The Los Angeles Arboretum and Botanic Gardens)  / the volunteers Carolyn Gray Anderson, Noe Gaytan, Sara Abed, Ernesto Perez, Jeremy Jarrin, Alex Castellon, Siobhan Feehan, Josh Stone, Jamie Shi, Kate Gilbert, Jamie McAndrews, Claudia Borgna, Veronica Franco, Maya Gingery, and Kate Parsons / Jenn Su (Thank You For Coming) /  Roman Jaster (graphic design, posters and website) / Knowhow Shop (sign fabrication) /  Isabel Avila (photography) / Kristy Baltezore and Gabie Strong (KCHUNG) / Shamim Momin, Samantha Frank, Maryam Hosseinzadeh, and Laura Hyatt (LAND) / the support of the James Irvine Foundation.

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On April 18th, 2014, LOOKING FORWARD TO THE WILDFLOWERING LA…

2014-04-18-final-posters…spring show/events next weekend, April 26 & 27, for which I’ll be taping out a massive 40′ x 70′ freeway map of LA county, upon which the 50 sites will be marked by fresh wildflower cuttings – ideally brought by the owners themselves on Saturday – so that visitors will be able to take a mini wildflower tour…


WILDFLOWERING L.A. SPRING EXHIBITION & EVENTS, APRIL 26-27, noon to 6pm

 
A culminating exhibition of Fritz Haeg’s Wildflowering L.A. project, commissioned and organized by LAND (Los Angeles Nomadic Division) will take place on Saturday, April 26 and Sunday, April 27, 2014 at THE SHED (1355 Lincoln Avenue, Pasadena, 91103) Pasadena’s emerging space for urban agriculture, planning, permaculture, and land use by La Loma Development Company.  

2014-04-18-WFLAThe installation will feature flower cuttings and photos fresh from the project sites presented on a vast Los Angeles County map, along with project archives, artist-designed posters, educational activities for all ages, conversations with experts including representatives from the Theodore Payne Foundation and project participants, a live broadcast by KCHUNG, music by Pawing at the Ceiling, seasonal refreshments by Thank You For Coming, and more.  Check the project’s website, www.wildflowering.org, for  ongoing project updatesbackground informationwildflower resources, the map of all 50 sites, and streaming #wildfloweringla updates from Twitter and Instagram.
+ Large-scale map installation by Fritz Haeg to visually depict the expanse of the 50 Wildflowering L.A. sites across Los Angeles County with clippings from project participants, projections of site photos, archival materials, and artist-designed posters for ongoing viewing
+ Receptions at 4:30pm daily-Educational/family activities from 12pm-5pm for kids (but great for all ages and adults) including sensory stations, flower pressing, seed treasures, printmaking, exquisite corpse, a somatic creative movement class with Maya Gingery, and more
+ Music by Pawing at the Ceiling (Roman Jaster and Nicole Jaffe) on Saturday from 1-1:30pm
+ Conversations at 2pm, 3pm, and 4pm daily with experts, including representatives from the Theodore Payne Foundation and project participants
CONVERSATIONS
Saturday, April 26th
  • 2pm: Andy Wilcox, Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture, Cal Poly Pomona, Sites #37: Cal Poly Pomona and #38: York Blvd.
  • 3pm: Richard Schulhof, Director, Los Angeles County Arboretum and Botanic Garden, Site #22: LA Arboretum
  • 4pm: Leigh Adams, Sites #13: Westridge School, #14: Pasadena Casting Pond, and #22: LA Arboretum

Sunday, April 27th

  • 2pm: Joan M. Leong, Professor, Biological Sciences Graduate Program, Cal Poly Pomona  Pollinators Study
  • 3pm: Joshua Link, Landscape Architect, Ecotone Studios, Site #47: Eagle Rock Post Office
  • 4pm: Genny Arnold, Seed Program Manager, Theodore Payne Foundation, Site #21
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On March 21st, 2014, ‘WILDFLOWERING L.A.’ ENTERS THE BLOOMING & TOURING SEASON…

Site #37: Cal Poly College of Environmental Design (photo: Isabel Avila)

In November 2013 owners of of 50 selected sites across Los Angeles county were prescribed one of four custom wildflower seed mixes based on their location. Participants were responsible for sowing, watering, weeding, and occasionally hunting gophers. Over the past few weeks we have been receiving reports from these Wildflowering L.A. sites. The first accounts of flowers came in early February, but with our early spring Southern California heat and sun kicking in, we have many sites experiencing their first waves of dramatic blooms. This will continue in secessional waves through June with various species coming up, flowering, and then receding as others take the stage.

Site #44: 478 E. Avenue 28, Lincoln Heights (photo: Isabel Avila)

On January 17th, 2014, our governor Jerry Brown declared a “drought state of emergency” in California. And while the orchards and fields that feed us are drying up in the Central Valley, our green lawns and flowing fountains down here in Los Angeles make it seem like everything is just fine. Perhaps the Wildflowering L.A. project might have been easier during a rainy El Niño year when our wildflowers really pop and Angelenos make the pilgrimage out to the flowing poppy fields of the Antelope Valley. Though it’s been a challenge, this drought period seems like the most appropriate and provocative time for us to really pay attention to the land we live on, to what really grows here, along with the whys, whens, and hows.

Site #27: 4237 Eagle Rock Boulevard

Participants have been sending their ‘bloom ratings,’ estimates of when their wildflower site might peak, some current snapshots, and general anecdotes about their experiences with the project. I have been compiling this information and adding it to our ‘map’ page, which will continue to be updated through June. Around that time the plants will start to dry up and set seed. Participants will be encouraged to let this cycle play out, allowing the meadows to gradually turn golden brown and broadcast seed for the next season.

Site #17: 1150 W. Grovecenter Street, Covina (photo: Isabel Avila)

From March to June 2014 you can take a tour to view the sites with the best displays which include homes, churches, schools, botanic gardens, public parks, vacant lots, and even a U.S. post office. All of the sites are visible from streets and public paths (but should not be entered). A prominent carved wood sign, inspired by state and federal park signage, identifies each site which range in size from 500 to 2000 square feet.

Wildflowering L.A. map / Bloom Ratings: Red = Excellent / Yellow = Good / Blue = Low to None

To help plan your tour, start on our interactive map page, and then download this PDF list of the most active sites organized by geographic region. And for the energetic cyclist crowd in North East L.A. – where there is an especially heavy concentration of sites – a special map for touring on two wheels has been created. Share your text and photo blooming updates with the Twitter and Instagram hashtag #wildfloweringLA, which will post directly to this webpage, where you can also see what people are finding at other sites across town.

Site #44: 478 E. Avenue 28, Lincoln Heights (photo: Isabel Avila)

Future Wildflowering L.A. programs include an installation/exhibition about the project presented April 26-27, 2014 at The Shed (1355 Lincoln Avenue, Pasadena 91103) hosted by La Loma Development; a late-June seed-sharing event; and a fall release event for a booklet telling the story of selected participating sites with before and after photos.

Site #28: 3847 DuRay Place, Baldwin Hills (photo: Isabel Avila)

Wildflowering L.A. sites were selected from an open call based on public visibility and distribution across the County. Owners of selected sites are given free native wildflower seed mixes at workshops in partnership with the Theodore Payne Foundation. Soil preparation, seeding, and wildflower tending were demonstrated, and one of four custom wildflower seed mixes was prescribed – Coastal, Flatlands, Hillside, and Roadside – inspired by Reyner Banham’s 1971 book, Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies.

Site #25 – 2821 West View Street, West Adams (photo; Ryan Benoit, The Horticult)

For more information visit the ‘about’ and ‘resources’ pages of the website. And posted yesterday at The Horticult is a great tour of various project sites by Chantal Aida Gordon, Field of Dreams: ‘Wildflowering L.A.’ Turns Urban Sprawl Into Native, Magical Meadows.

Special shout-outs to Roman Jaster for the graphic design and website; the boys at the Knowhow Shop for the sign fabrication (and super idea of burning them, instead of staining them black); Isabel Avila for the official before and after photos; Lili Singer and Genny Arnold at the Theodore Payne Foundation for their support/expertise/enthusiasm; the ladies at LAND (Los Angeles Nomadic Division), Samantha Frank, Laura Hyatt, Maryam Hosseinzadeh, and especially Shamim Momin.

#40 – Carthay Center Elementary School, 6351 W. Olympic Boulevard (photo: Ryan Benoit, The Horticult)

Wildflowering L.A. is a native wildflower seed sowing initiative throughout Los Angeles County by artist Fritz Haeg. It is presented by LAND (Los Angeles Nomadic Division) in partnership with the Theodore Payne Foundation and supported by a grant from the James Irvine Foundation.

Phacelia tanacetifolia (Lacy Phacelia) from the Roadside and Hillside mixes (photo: Isabel Avila)

 

 

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On February 22nd, 2014, A ‘WILDFLOWERING L.A.’ OPEN HOUSE…

a winter's day picnic in the wilds of the L.A. foothills

a winter’s day picnic in the wilds of the L.A. foothills

…this hot sunny winter’s afternoon brought together participants from many of the 50 sites across the county to the wild foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains of the Theodore Payne Foundation (a favorite place in the Los Angeles area, a special sanctuary to consider what our land was like before it was urbanized, and a primary inspiration for the Wildflowering L.A. project) for a short native gardening talk, a hike up the hill to see Theodore Payne Foundation’s own Wildflowering L.A. site while drinking some freshly picked native plant tea infusions of sage and Yerba buena, but the best part was checking out the photos of everyone’s wildflower sites which they were showing off like baby pictures.

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On January 15th, 2014, WILDFLOWERING LA: SOME WORDS ON WATERING…

Wildflowering LA site #47,  at the Eagle Rock US Post Office on Colorado Blvd.

Wildflowering LA site #47, at the Eagle Rock US Post Office on Colorado Blvd.

…were just written up by Theodore Payne Foundation‘s Genny Arnold for the participants at the 50 Wildflowering LA sites across LA County:

California is experiencing its driest year on record. Compound scant rainfall with persistent, drying Santa Ana winds, and we find our landscapes becoming stressed. We can learn about what our urban gardens will do by looking to nature; if our wild areas are showing signs of drought stress, our cultivated gardens will certainly follow suit.

Most of you are probably at the stage where wildflower seedlings have reached a couple inches in height, and you have now cut back on watering. You may notice that your seedlings are not wilting, but they also aren’t showing signs of growth and are just existing and maintaining at that low height.  

Because of this year’s especially dry circumstances, we recommend a good deep watering to the site every 7 to 10 days — at least through this warm and windy spell. Watch the seedlings closely; if you see signs of wilting or discoloration, then apply deeper and more frequent watering until they stabilize.  

The response of seedlings at each of the 50 Wildflowering L.A. sites will vary. Watch your meadow and get to know how the seedlings are responding to this special weather period. In the process, you’ll be brought closer to your garden and to the natural world as it responds to our unique climate.  

If the dry weather continues through spring, your wildflower meadows will boast a much showier and longer bloom if they continue to receive a deep watering every week or so. Regular irrigation will also increase the chances of a healthy seed set, ensuring that the wildflowers come back in good number next year. 

Keep in mind that even if you are watering every 7 to 10 days, you’re still using MUCH less water than a thirsty exotic lawn would require to stay green during this drought.

- Genny Arnold, Theodore Payne Foundation

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On January 14th, 2014, WILDFLOWERING LA: WHAT ABOUT THE WEEDS?..

Wildflowering LA site #17

Wildflowering LA site #17

…is the recurring question coming from many of the 50 participating Wildflowering LA sites across LA county, and here is Theodore Payne Foundation‘s Genny Arnold detailed response:

It’s exciting to see wildflower seedlings emerge and grow. However, it can be disconcerting to observe weeds coming up right beside them! This common problem in sowing wildflower meadows can be addressed in a simple manner (with a little elbow grease, of course!).

Don’t worry too much about trampling or damaging existing wildflower seedlings when entering your sow site to extract weeds. Each mature wildflower plant will occupy about ½ to 1 square foot of space, so some loss will not affect the overall appearance of your meadow.  

Methods for establishing small areas in which to sit and weed: 

+ Place paver stones on a few locations within the site. Once the plants have matured, the pavers either won’t show or will still look attractive. In addition, these spots can serve as vantage points from which to photograph flowers, insects and birds come spring! 

+ Create a few narrow pathways (perhaps three or so, depending on the size of the area) and use them to enter the site for weeding. Again, once the plants have matured, they will visually block the staggered paths. Establishing these thoroughfares can be as easy as choosing where you will walk and sit, akin to a deer selecting its favorite access through a meadow and walking the path repeatedly!  Plants in your pathways may be completely removed, or just walked on and not removed – that way, tough seedlings that do survive will still have a chance to develop.

Weed removal tips:

+ First, identify the weed. The weeding method will depend on the nature of the target weed, which will most likely fall into one of four categories: exotic annual weed, exotic perennial weed, exotic annual bunch grass, or exotic perennial lawn grass (such as Bermuda grass).

Exotic annual weeds and bunch grasses may be pulled out from the base at ground level – this method may displace some desired seedlings, which is probably just fine, depending on the number of native wildflower seedlings within the plot. The volume of seeds issued per site accounted for some attrition or loss of seedlings. Alternately, with narrow snips or clippers, go in at the base of the weed just below the soil surface and cut. The roots will remain underground but will desiccate and die, once detached from the top growth.   

Exotic perennial weeds with deep roots must be removed entirely – roots and all – to prevent them from returning. A trowel or “dandelion digger,” which get under the main plant and help you pull, are excellent tools for the job. Deep-rooted rhizomatous grasses, such as Bermuda, are not controlled by cuts just below the surface. In fact, cutting the rhizomes will actually stimulate growth. Sprigs and clumps of Bermuda grass must be completely removed from the base of the outgrowth with as many roots as possible – but dig no deeper than four inches (to avoid bringing up weed seeds and disturbing surrounding plants). 

Our best advice is to simply to do the best you can. If you lose some wildflower seedlings, you will still have others left. At TPF, we are also dealing with weed issues on our Wildflowering LA plot – there is no magic bullet to rid an area of pre-existing exotic weeds, but patience and repeated weeding efforts will pay off over time.  

Sowing seed always involves some unpredictable variables respective to each unique site. You will learn about these factors as you go. A fully flush meadow may not occur in the first year of sowing. You may want to prepare your soil again over the summer and re-sow next fall, with the advantage of the knowledge you have gained in this initial year of gardening experience. The important thing is that you have taken the first step to establishing a native landscape. Take a moment to pat yourself on the back for your hard work, your patience, and for this meaningful contribution to our precious ecosystem here in Los Angeles!

- Genny Arnold, Theodore Payne Foundation

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On January 9th, 0214, FIRST FLOWERS…

first wildflowers of the season, from Wildflowering LA site #17

…small yellow Tidy Tips (Layia platyglossa), have been reported blooming over the past few days from various Wildflowering L.A. sites across the county, signaling the first wildflowers of the season. (Check out the images and updates on the Instagram and Twitter feed page, or drive by the confirmed locations at sites #17, #18, and #37 to see for yourself).

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On October 22nd, 2013, ONE ACRE OF LAWN…

a mountain of LA Arboretum lawn looming over the one acre site, ready for wildflowers

a mountain of LA Arboretum lawn looming over the one acre site, ready for wildflowers

…at the Los Angeles Arboretum was just removed today in preparation for a long term project I am in the early stages of planning, but initially as the flagship of 50 sites across Los Angeles County for Wildflowering L.A. (our first public workshop is at the Arboretum this Sunday, 11-5)

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On May 28th, 2013, SENDING THANKFUL GARDEN GREETINGS…

the Saturday and Sunday morning EE 15 garden volunteer crews

the Saturday and Sunday morning EE 15 garden volunteer crews

…to all of the family, friends, neighbors, and local volunteers who came out to help establish Edible Estate #15 this weekend! Catherine Schoenherr, John Schoenherr, Andrea Schoenherr, Stanley Leonard, Aaron Schoenherr, Kristin Beardsley, Roseann Schoenherr, Ken, Sarah Schultz, Eric Crosby, Anna Bierbrauer, Ashley Duffalo, Bartholomew Ryan, Will Gobeli, Bridget Mendel, Larry and Mary Haeg, Danny Haeg, Andrew Haeg, Emily Saunders, Jen Murphy, John Andrew, Emily Haskins, Rosalie Starenko, Stephi Drago, Zak Schmidt, Justin Densberger, Alan Sabat, Maggie Richardson, Dr. Chris Strunk, Pam Sawyer, Bea Hoskins, Kelsea, Dombrovski, Scott Mitchell, Katy Berglund, Kathy Lenius, Nick Vlcek, Rich and Penny Sitz, Becky Hagen, Michelle LeBlanc, Rebeca Ratte, Diane Anderson, Audrey Cullen, Dan Ibarra, Laura and Todd Robinson, Atanu Sen, Caroline Casey, Ilene Mojsilov, Masami Kawazato, Aaron Merrill, Karla and Markus Toft, Brett Baldauf, Chesney Engquist, Sara Kruper, Julie Hoffend, Susan Vance, Greg and Kathy Whaley, Widerski Family, Jacob Elsasser, Janel Larson and Michael, Brett and Lisa Bursch and family, Ken and Carol Koscik, Bill and Peggy Elsasser, and Akoni Garcia.

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On May 26th, 2013, PLANTING DAY…

planting day at Edible Estate #15

planting day at Edible Estate #15 (photos by Alison Malone)

…at Edible Estate #15 in Woodbury was a bit more tranquil than the heavy-duty sod/rock/log/dirt moving yesterday, but still hectic with hundreds of plants, trees, shrubs, vines, and seeds of many varieties being set out by myself and landscape architect Anna Bierbrauer – in the beds established  the day before – for teams of friends, family, neighbors, and volunteers following hot on our heels to plant while the aromatic haze of bread oven smoke wafted above us – foreshadowing the pizza making to come.

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On May 25th, 2013, DAY ONE OF EDIBLE ESTATE #15…

Edible Estate #15, day one

Edible Estate #15, day one

…installation with the hands of over 50 volunteers gets us farther along than I had hoped, finishing the day with most of the lawn rolled up and piled in mounds covered with fresh compost, vegetable beds bermed up to the back of a log circle, a U-shaped woodland path under the existing crab apple, a low rain garden near the house excavated with great effort by the Walker Art Center curator, a 12′ diameter log circle opening on to the massive wood oven just finished days before, an elevated terrace with retaining wall and gravel surface for a harvest table, all held together by the remains of a local fallen willow chopped up to create the bones, edging, seating, and retaining for the now fully inscribed garden plan – ready for it’s planting tomorrow. (EE #15 webpage)

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On May 24th, 2013, DIRT CIRCLES IN THE FRONT LAWN…

dirt circles in Woodbury

dirt circles in Woodbury

…of the Woodbury, Minnesota residence where we are laying out the first design marks of Edible Estate #15 this afternoon make it seem like aimless drunken teens went on a joyride spinning out a perfect circle – but it is actually marking the only bit of grass that will be left when we are done on Sunday.

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On May 23rd, 2013, SOFT OPENING OF THE FORAGING CIRCLE…

the first Foraging Circle gathering

the first Foraging Circle gathering

…commissioned by the Walker Art Center for the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden tonight was proceeded by a mad dash for some teapots and tea party accoutrements to Wendy at Practical Goods in St. Paul – where I have already been sourcing everything for the Domestic Integrities installation opening in the galleries August 8th – and a speedy bread baking session to have a few spelt loaves ready for our first gathering in the circle -  just for the project team, and welcoming the Woodbury family to the Walker before we rip of their front yard on Saturday.

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On May 22nd, 2013, THE EE 15 PLAN…

proposed layout of Edible Estate #15: Twin Cities

proposed layout of Edible Estate #15: Twin Cities

…has been evolving since the substantially sized Woodbury front lawn site was selected a few weeks ago, but we need to get real since it hits the ground on Friday with the design laid out on the lawn, on Saturday with dirt/wood/rock moving, and on Sunday with planting and mulching – so during my sacred early-riser hours this morning I get it all down for the last time, including places for: kid’s garden for the child-care across the street, berry brambles, wood bread oven, harvest table platform, low rain garden, high fruit tree mounds, gathering/conversation circle, and in a new step of grass-tolerance for the last edition of the Edible Estate garden series, a little lawn left in place as the primary circular  path. (EE15 webpage)

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On May 16th, 2013, PLANTING DAY AT EDIBLE ESTATE #14…

plants and mulch hit the ground in Hammel

plants and mulch hit the ground in Hammel

…saw a bunch of fruit trees planted in a gentle arc on the north side of the front lawn, hundreds of strawberry cuttings inserted in the terraced slope along the street, a series of cute little herb gardens in triangular raised beds installed, a seating semi-circle of logs placed, a wild area of berries planted, a wigwam of massive forest branches planted with bean and pea seeds, and a circular path lines with varieties of veg – after which bags and bags and bags of goreos leaf litter dragged from the nearby woods was spread generously.

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On May 15th, 2013, EE #14 PLANTING DAY ONE…

the small front lawn transforming through the first day with mounded tree plantings, wigwam, and circular path

the small front lawn transforming through the first day with mounded tree plantings, wigwam, and circular path

…in the suburban development of Hammel outside of Aarhus, Denmark got off to a slow start this morning with only a small fraction of the 65 architecture students on hand to do the brute manual labor of boulder, log, and dirt moving, but when they finally did show up in force the garden took shape in a flash – with logs rolled into place to retain the rich soil which was deposited shovel by shovel full, then graded awaiting plants in the morning. Thanks to students Students: Adnan Brkic, Aisha Mahjoub Seeberg, Anette Vintervold, Anna Kristine Dyhr Hvejse, Anne Catherine Lyager Langer, Anne Lovisa Thorsén, Anne Monrad Nielsen, Astrid Holst Stjernholm, Casper Storm Rasmussen, Charlotte Pedersen, Elisabeth Hult Jakobsen, Frederik Pilgård Jensen, Gina Helene Hov, Hanne Hiorth, Hildegunn Hindrum Grønningsætter, Iben Hjøllund Enevoldsen, Ida Gunhild Skovbjerg, Jakob Ørum, Janne Fjeldtvedt Pedersen, Jeanette Kongsgaard, Julie Krogh Kristensen, Kadriye Bige Ozbek, Karen Emilie Sørensen, Kimmernaq Wilhelmine Rakel Lyberth, Liv Skovgård Andersen, Lærke Tolstrup Sørensen, Mads Baj Engedal, Mads Bjerg Nørkjær, Malene Høyer Pedersen, Maria Sindal Stæhr, Marie Søndergaard Ramsing, Morten Bilde Hougaard, Pernille Kjær Sommer, Rabea Sara Gonnsen, Sascha Strandgård Rasmussen, Sebastian Thor Reumert, Sidsel Lindskrog Skogstad, Simen Marzano Frey, Simone Lundtoft Jørgensen, Sindri Þorkelsson, Vicki Buhl Lausen, Andreas Nielsen, Andreas Obel Bjørn-Præst, Annika Persch Andersen, Astrid Brønden Damsgaard, Benjamin Erben , Ditte Lynggaard Viktor, Eirin Marie Hauge, Jannie Sophie Grønneberg Hauge, Jarno van den Berg, Jenny Tuong-Vi Tran, Kristian Gatten Pedersen, Kristoffer Hedegaard Andreasen, Mads Jørgensen, Mariann Kim Stigsen, Mette Bonde Romme, Ole Gundahl Sørensen, Oliver Thomas Edwards, Peder Gaare, Rasmus Nørfeldt, Rasmus Riedel, Ruben Lejf Kramer Sørensen, Ryan Canning, Samuel Møller Nielsen, Simeon Østerlund Nielsen, Thomas Andreas Bevan, Dilja Rannveig Boasdóttir, Birthe Urup Nygaard, and instructor: Marie Markman. (Edible Estate #14) Thanks t

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On May 14th, 2013, THE WOODS OF HAMMEL, DENMARK…

gathering leaf litter in the Hammel forest

gathering leaf litter in the Hammel forest

…just steps from the site of Edible Estate #14 at the Pederson residence is one of my favorite things about the site, so down the street a few houses we go, entering into the dappled spring green shade with wheel barrows and bags in hand to gather things for the garden – long branches for wigwam plant structures, semi-decomposed leaf litter for plant mulch, logs and rocks for retaining the beds, stumps for sitting – bringing parts of the forest back in (and as we were hauling our last big load a neighbor passing us on the street made a comment with a sweet face and a smile – later translated for me, she asked “…and are you taking the whole forest?”)

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On May 11th, 2013, UNDER THE CHERRY BLOSSOMS IN KUNGSTRÄDGÅRDEN…

a Saturday walk in Kungsträdgården in Stockholm

…in Stockholm this afternoon where everyone is soaking up the rays after a long winter, and though it is still a bit chilly to my sensitive LA constitution, the sun is already leaning towards it’s summer solstice here with sunset at 9:15 and sunrise at 4:15.

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By Fritz Haeg on May 12, 2013 | Stockholm
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